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April Intro

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April Newsletter
Chinese Naming: Danger + Opportunity Newsletter April Main Page
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Good Characters is in the business of helping American companies market to Greater China, specifically in the area of naming and branding. We keep a close eye on Chinese markets while maintaining a healthy distance, located here in America, to keep our fresh perspective, objectivity and creativity. The aim of this newsletter is to provide you with mini case studies of companies that did the right-or wrong-thing in Chinese naming. It's our intention that these observations will become a platform for advising you, our informed subscribers, on the best practices in Chinese brand naming.

Generally speaking, American products or services sell themselves in the Chinese market simply because they are perceived as having higher quality than domestic products or services. "Made in U.S.A." triumps "Made in China" almost every time, even when we are talking about identical products with the same American brand name.

Because American companies are viewed as capable and resourceful, the danger is that imperfections in Chinese naming will be viewed, at best, as slack concern by the American company, and at worst, as a sign that the company is not trustworthy. It's desirable to keep your "American-ness" or "foreign-ness" since Chinese customers buy that for its own aforementioned value. However, when a company's foreignness comes off as ignorance of Chinese culture or languages, the business opportunity is lost.

Finally, since we're talking about the Chinese market, it's only natural to pay respect to the ancient
importance of naming-an art we did not, admittedly, invent.

"When a name is not instituted correctly, what is said cannot be followed. When what is said cannot be followed, work cannot be carried on to success." Confucius, The Analects of Confucius 13:3.



   

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